Private David W. Payne Camp #1633

A "Sons of Confederate Veterans" Camp at Blairsville, Georgia

Private David W. Payne Camp #1633, P.O.B. 2212, Blairsville, Union County, Ga. 30514 Contact us!

Andrew Jackson Young
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YoungAndrewJackson
Andrew J. Young
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~minascpi/YoungAndrewJackson.htm


Birth

Born: November 16, 1814 in ?Blount County (Maryville) or Grundy County? Tennessee
• Father: Robert Raulston Young, Dr.
• Mother: Mary McReynolds Alexander

Marriage

Sarah Addie Barclay [known as Addie] (~1825 - ? )
Sarah Addie Barclay was born circa 1825 in Tennessee.
Children: 1. Thomas J. Young, 29; 2. West Young, 13; 3. Mary Young, 12; 4. Eliza Young, 10; 5. Ada Young, 8; 6. Robert R. Young, 5. All ages as of 1860 census. Later in 1867, Andrew, Jr. was born.
All children but Thomas and Andrew, Jr. were born in Union County, Georgia.
Adie’s father was Elihu S. Barclay [Sr.] of Tennessee then Georgia.
Addie Barclay was the sister of William P. Barclay, Elihu S. “Sandy” Barclay [Jr.], Hugh W. Barclay and Julius Barclay.
“Sandy” Barclay later commanded Pillipp’s Legion.
William Barclay later commanded the 23rd Georgia Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He died leading his regiment at Sharpsburg.
Hugh W. Barclay (after serving in the 23rd) later commanded the 11th Georgia Volunteer Calvary Regiment. See below, Andrew Young first commanded the 11th.
Julius Barclay later served in the 52 Georgia Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Co. K as Captain. He was killed in action at the Battle of Atlanta.

Death

• Died: September 24, 1889
Burial: Cleburne City Cemetery, Block 41, Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas

Before the Civil War

• Moved to Union County, Georgia after the 1840 census
1850 Census: 85th District, Union County, Georgia
Andrew Young is listed as “Physician / Surgeon” in the census.
Also see
John S. Fain. He was living at the home of Andrew Young in 1850.
1860 Census: Ivy Log Post Office, Union County, Georgia
Andrew Young is listed as “Physician” in this census. His son Thomas, living in Andrew’s household, is also listed as a “Physician.”


Slavery


According to the Slave Schedule of the 1860 Census of Union County, Georgia, Andrew Young owned four slaves.
1. age 36, male, black; 2. age 26, female, black; 3. age 18, female, black; 4. age 8, female, mulatto


Civil War

23rd Georgia Volunteer Infantry Regiment ~
Young commenced service as a Private in Co K (Union County), 23rd Georgia Infantry on August 31, 1861.
Elected Captain November 17, 1861.
Appears last on roll for February 28, 1862.


30th Georgia Battalion Cavalry ~
Organized the 2nd day of May 1864, Lieut. Col. Andrew Young commanding
The Battalion was last recorded as detailed to Headquarters of the District of N. E. Georgia, Athens, Georgia October 31, 1864.
The 30th Battalion Georgia Cavalry became part of the 11th Regiment Georgia Cavalry November 14, 1864.
The 30th Battalion / 11th Georgia Cavalry Regiment were issued carbines from the Cook & Brother Armory in Athens and imported Austrian Rifles.

Defense of Athens, Georgia ~
Confederate General Howell Cobb, who was from Athens and had been appointed commander of all defense operations in Georgia, had the insight to know sooner or later Athens could be a target of attack.
In early June 1864, he put Confederate Colonel Andrew Young in charge of getting the defense fortifications constructed in Athens.
Anecdote see below: 1864, probably June in Annals of Athens, Georgia, 1801-1901, pg.262 by Augustus Longstreet Hull


“A number of others were enrolled in a company attached to Col. Andrew Young's regiment, [11th Georgia Calvary] of which Clovis G. Tahnadge was Adjutant and John E. Tahnadge, A. G. Elder and R. B. Hodgson members. Col. Young, a man of great firmness, commanded this regiment of State troops, encamped for a time at the old fair ground. He had need of a portable forge and smith's tools for shoeing his horses, and the only one to be found was owned by Mrs. J. C. Orr. Under his authority to impress such things for military use the Colonel sent a demand for the forge.
His report to Gen. Howell Cobb in relating this incident says : ‘Mrs. Orr refused to surrender the forge and said I could not have it except across her dead body. I have sent a wagon for the forge with orders to shoot Mrs. Orr if necessary to get it.’ Then a postscript : ‘The wagon has come with the forge, the necessity of the case not requiring the shooting of Mrs. Orr.”

[The “Old Fairground” was located where the University of Georgia’s Intramural Fields, south-east corner of East Campus Rd. and College Station Rd. are now located.]


The Battle of Barber's Creek ~

11th Georgia Volunteer Calvary Regiment ~
The 11th Regiment Georgia Cavalry, by S. O. No. 271, A. & I. G. O. was formed from the 30th Battalion Georgia Cavalry, with the addition of four companies raised under authority of the War Department where the conscript Act could not be enforced (North Georgia) dated November 14, 1864
Lieut. Col. Andrew Young commanding
• An example of his service is below

Battle of Battle of Balls Ferry, Oconee on the Oconee River
near Athens

November 21 - 26 , 1864

Lt. Colonel Andrew Young commanding the 30th Georgia Battalion [not fully organized yet as the 11th Georgia Calvary Regiment] arrived in Oconee on the 24th. Gen. Joseph Wheeler led his four thousand cavalrymen along the right flank of the right wing. They left Macon and swam across the Oconee River at Blackshear's Ferry. Lt. Col. Gaines and his Alabama Cavalry were sent to Ball's Ferry. They strengthed the fortifications preparing for the larger force which would soon come. The remainder of Wheeler's force moved to Tennille. On the night of the 25th the head of the 15th corps was camped in Irwinton with its rear in Gordon. The head of the 17th corps was still camped near the Oconee River Bridge with its rear along the railroad back through Toombsboro.

Gone to Texas

Physician in Texas
1870 Census: Andrew Young is in Cleburne, Johnson Co., Texas
The 1870 census shows the addition of another offspring of Andrew and Sarah Young - Andrew, Jr. aged 3.
1880 Census: Andrew Young is in Cleburne, Johnson Co., Texas
Families Barclay ?








1. Military service is given in the Roster of the Confederate Soldiers of Georgia
as follows: commenced service as Private Co K, 23rd Georgia Infantry on August
31, 1861. Elected Captain November 17, 1861. Appears on last roll for February
28, 1862.

2. From Texas Burial Sites of Civil War Notables: A Biographical and Pictoral
Field Guide, by Mundie, Allardice, et.al., p.322.

Young, Andrew: Civil War Service: Surgeon CSA, Captain 23rd Georgia Infantry,
Colonel 11th Georgia Cavalry, Born: 1814, Grundy Co., TN, Died: September 24,
1889, Cleburne, Texas, Occupation: Prewar Union County GA physician, Postwar
physician in Cleburne, Buried: Cleburne City Cemetery, Cleburne, Johnson County,
Grave Location: Block 41, References: "Dr. Andrew Young"

3. From Lee's Colonels, 3rd Edition, by Robert K. Krick, Appendix, p.494

Young, Andrew - Lieutenant-Colonel 30th Battalion Georgia Cavalry; Colonel 11th
Georgia Cavalry.




A. T. Blalock, age 18, Farmer, resident of Clayton, Rabun County, Georgia, enlisted as a Private in Captain Price's Company F, (Rabun Gap Defenders) 30th Battalion, Georgia Cavalry**, May 25, 1864 at Clayton, Georgia, to serve in North Eastern Georgia, last recorded as detailed to Headquarters of the District of N. E. Georgia, Athens, Georgia October 31, 1864, no further records
**This company subsequently became Company F, 11th Regiment Georgia Cavalry.

The 30th Battalion Georgia Cavalry,with the addition of four companies raised under authority of the War Department where the conscript Act could not be enforced, constituted the 11th Regiment Georgia Cavalry, by S. O. No. 271, A. & I. G. O., dated November 14,1864

A. Milton NIX; 1st sergeant, 1st Georgia Infantry (USA) captured and executed as a deserter at Gainesville, Georgia after court martial (or depending on your point of view, a P.O.W. that was murdered); A.M. Nix had been in Co. C, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry. He is buried at National Cemetery in Marietta, GA. The 1st Georgia Infantry was organized by, officered by and supplied by Federal Forces but was never officially accepted into the U.S.A Army.
Submitted by David Friedly

Daniel BLACKWELL: 1st Georgia Infantry (USA) captured and executed as a
deserter at Gainesville, Georgia after court martial (or depending on your point of view, a P.O.W. that was murdered), November, 1864. He had been in Company C, 65th Georgia Confederate Infantry; buried in the National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.
Submitted by David Friedly

Thomas EDMONSON; 1st Georgia Infantry (USA) captured and executed as a
deserter at Gainesville, Georgia after court martial (or depending on your point of view, a P.O.W. that was murdered), November, 1864. He had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; buried in the National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.
Submitted by David Friedly